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Longevity in the UK

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Kip Bennett
Kip Bennett
Posts: 24
Joined: 24th Nov 2009
Location: USA
quotePosted at 16:31 on 16th August 2011

While we were visiting I read an article in The Guardian that was discussing longevity in the UK. I already knew that the British as a whole have a longer lifespan than the Americans, as well as much lower incidences of Diabetes. They are sometimes listed as 2nd or 3rd after the US(no 1) in obesity, but the margin between number 1 and 2 is quite large, and then between 2 and 3 and 3 and 4 etc is minimal. Please do not try and catch up with our country in that department! Just avoid the KFC's I was surprised to see whilst visiting your land!!

Anyway, my question relates to longevity within your country geographically. The article stated that Devon, Dorset, Sussex, E Anglia(and other nearby counties) in that order enjoyed the greatest health and longevity--and it was much higher than the counties with the lowest. Scotland as a whole was the lowest, with Glasgow being much much worse off in health decline and shorter lifespans. Why? I would have guessed that the air was even cleaner up north. Even Northern England was less highly ranked in health compared to the south(except Cornwall was listed somewhere in between). Ireland and North Wales were also very low ranked, but South Wales a bit higher.  I wish I could find this article online and copy/paste it.  Just wondered if anyone knows the reasons behind this. The article didn't give reasons, but it did cite the study which was apparently very very big and took years to collate.

If I do find it I will try and post it here(if anyone is interested).

Thanks---   Kip 

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Ron Brind
Ron Brind
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Joined: 26th Oct 2003
Location: England
quotePosted at 20:35 on 16th August 2011
Even if you do find the article Kip, it will not be permitted on POE if you copy n paste it, for copyright reasons. You can of course produce a link to it in the forum, or use your own words but we cannot accept copied material from any source whatsoever.
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Kip Bennett
Kip Bennett
Posts: 24
Joined: 24th Nov 2009
Location: USA
quotePosted at 00:37 on 17th August 2011
Oh ok Ron! I'm learning as I go! Thanks. No one seems very interested anyway...lol. 
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Sue H
Sue H
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Joined: 29th Jun 2007
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quotePosted at 01:48 on 17th August 2011

Post your link, Kip. sometimes the board runs a little slow. People will show up eventually. 

Quite a few members of my family made it up into their 90's. Even my old grandmother, who I never met, lived to be 92, way back in the 50's when she passed away. That was a decent age back in that day.

Just recently (within four years) I had an uncle who died five days before his 100th birthday. I think he would have lived beyond that had his beloved wife not died a few months earlier.

My family were country dwellers, growing their own food, chickens in the coop, some even had a cow or a goat. all of these things I believe helped them to live a good long life.

I will be interested to see you link. 

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Paul HiltonPremier Member - Click for more info
Paul Hilton
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Joined: 21st Nov 2004
Location: UK
quotePosted at 02:34 on 17th August 2011

Something similar was mentioned on Radio Berkshire a week or so ago when they said in the not too distant future, 25% of the population will live to over 100.  They put a significant factor as being economic status.  I think Scotland's heart attack rate is higher than in England too.

KFC has been over here Tim at least 40 years that I know of. I remember in the early 60s in the US when Col. Sanders was a proper resturant chain and not a fast food outlet.

A relation of mine was 10 years old when Lincoln was elected; got married the same year as the Battle of the Little Big Horn 5 years before the Gunfight at the OK Corral, and died in the early part of WW2----1850 to 1940. 



Edited by: Paul Hilton at:19th August 2011 14:48
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Ruth Gregory
Ruth Gregory
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Joined: 25th Jul 2007
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quotePosted at 04:24 on 17th August 2011

I think a lot of the better health and longevity over there has to do with most of the people not having a car under their butts every time they go someplace.  Public transportation is huge, and even if you're riding buses and trains to get around, you have to walk to the station or bus stop.  In London, every sidewalk is packed full of pedestrians.  And they're all walking fast.  I recently started doing a 2-mile brisk walk every day (my dog, Denzil takes me :-) and I've dropped 22 lbs. since May. 

Most of the 80+ year old people I know, who can still get around and are relatively healthy, credit a daily walk as the reason.

As for the regional differences you mentioned, it may have something to do with traditional foods in different regions - some local dishes (the best ones) are probably higher in fat or sugar. 

 

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Kip Bennett
Kip Bennett
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Joined: 24th Nov 2009
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quotePosted at 15:18 on 17th August 2011

Still trying to find the article on line(to post link).

My maternal grandfather was part of a longevity study with a Dr Perls through New England Journal of Medicine when he was 97(died age 99) and  they said the only three things they could find in common with those who lived long AND healthy lives were consuming honey(gramps kept bees his whole life), apples(he ate apple sauce as late night snack every night), walking(he walked daily), and long lived ancestors(his parents were both in their 90's). They also said that some people can do everything wrong, eat terribly, smoke, etc and still live long, and that others can do everything right and still die in their late 60's or 70's. Kind of makes one question everything!

That study is still being conducted so I'm sure they've come up with other factors.

Still curious about Devon/Dorset greater health compared to the North of the UK. It's a big difference, something like average lifespan late 80's in those southern counties compared to early 70's in the North.

 

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James Prescott
James Prescott
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quotePosted at 15:30 on 17th August 2011
funny thing that kip--i also have a relative aged 95,his secret was a drop of scotch most nights and a regular intake of honey"not at the same time" he goes out for walks every day and up to being late 80s was still playing golf three times a week.-------and he lives up north?Smile
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Kip Bennett
Kip Bennett
Posts: 24
Joined: 24th Nov 2009
Location: USA
quotePosted at 15:36 on 17th August 2011

Well I don't think this article was saying that no one can live long up north. It was giving averages. 

What is it about honey? 

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Kip Bennett
Kip Bennett
Posts: 24
Joined: 24th Nov 2009
Location: USA
quotePosted at 15:39 on 17th August 2011

Here is the link:

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2011/jun/08/life-expectancy-uk-data-health?intcmp=239 

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