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Rod BurkeyPremier Member - Click for more info
Rod Burkey
Posts: 549
Joined: 2nd Sep 2008
Location: UK
quotePosted at 15:55 on 5th February 2020

I used to do the odd wedding, and cloning became a real friend. One good example was during the signing of the register, when the groom kept blinking and realising this, I shot off a volley of shots, and yes, would you believe it, the only decent shot of the groom not gurning or with closed eyes had the bride looking decidedly odd. So, I used his "good" head and replaced one of his bad ones leaving the happy couple looking both attractive and very happy. It truly was impossible to detect, but a purist would probably dismiss my editing as blatant deception. 

At another wedding where I was a close friend of the family of the bride I cloned myself onto the group shot. Nobody ever remarked on it.  

Thanks Paul. 

 

  

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Peggy CannellPremier Member - Click for more info
Peggy Cannell
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quotePosted at 12:32 on 17th February 2020
Very clever,I expect a lot of photographers do the same,very handy.
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Darrell Evans
Darrell Evans
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Joined: 11th Sep 2018
Location: UK
quotePosted at 19:56 on 29th February 2020

Sorry I have not been able to get on for some time.

Cloning, manipulation, dodging and burning and any other type of enhancement to a shot has always been present it is just a case of it has become easier with software like PS. You do not need the skill it took in a darkroom. Things move on and it is not always liked by all or takes time to be excepted. Remember when auto focus appeared, what did you think about that? Modern mirrorless with eye detect, live view so you can see what you are going to get and image stabilisation are not to everyone’s taste but they are here and at some stage will be looked on as old technology that people reminisce over.

Back to the original topic. Does it not depend on what car is parked in your composition? Would you rather have a Silver Shadow in an old street shot rather than a modern Ford or a bright green Lambo? 

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Rod BurkeyPremier Member - Click for more info
Rod Burkey
Posts: 549
Joined: 2nd Sep 2008
Location: UK
quotePosted at 15:05 on 1st March 2020
To answer your last point Darrell, I suppose it's how one feels about the shapes of the said vehicle in conjunction with the background. Intent is the driving factor (no pun really intended) in what we choose to capture with our lenses. Dell Boy's three wheeler would suit some locations. 

When auto focus first entered my consciousness, I shunned it, a bit like I did with zoom lenses. Zooms were not great in the 1970s, and my young eyes could then focus very quickly. Now, zooms are incredible. My workhorse 24-105mm zoom never ceases to amaze me in its sharpness and auto focus is rapid and accurate in all lenses. Mirrorless cameras are here to stay. My current cameras and lenses deliver all I want right now, and at my age, well, I have to be realistic. Tempus fugit. 

In conclusion, I think we should accept all that is available in photography. It's an incredibly strong medium when used properly. I still have to hone my skills and love exploring new techniques. 

The final result is what counts. But that's just my opinion. 
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Edward LeverPremier Member - Click for more info
Edward Lever
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Location: UK
quotePosted at 12:49 on 2nd March 2020
On 29th February 2020 19:56, Darrell Evans wrote:

>>>>>>>>>>>Back to the original topic. Does it not depend on what car is parked in your composition? Would you rather have a Silver Shadow in an old street shot rather than a modern Ford or a bright green Lambo? 


I agree with you, Darrell. I think it does depend on the model of car, and also the number of cars in the scene. A row of ordinary cars (all looking very similar) parked nose to tail in an ancient thoroughfare is unlikely to make a pleasing image, whereas a single classic car parked in a similar setting might be very much more appealing.

I also agree with Rod's sentiments about the technical improvements in cameras and lenses. There is little excuse for wrongly exposed or out-of-focus images these days. The skill comes in having an eye for composition, lighting, and being in the right place at the right time.

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