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5 stars
Photo © Pat TroutPremier Member! Click for more info.. (27th March 2015)
Description
"St Agnes"

Wheal Coates is a former tin mine situated on the north coast of Cornwall, England, on the cliff tops between Porthtowan and St Agnes. It is preserved and maintained by the National Trust. ‘Wheal’ is Cornish for ‘place of work’, not 'mine' as is often stated. The term for 'mine' is 'bal', as in 'bal maidens', the women who worked on the surface. The site was worked for centuries but the surviving buildings date from the 1870s when deep underground mining began at the site and were stabilised and preserved in 1986. There are three engine houses that formerly housed Cornish engines. Towanroath Pumping Engine House (1872) was used to pump water from the adjacent 600 ft Towanroath shaft. Whim Engine House was added in 1880 to crush ore for processing. A calciner dating from 1910–1913 roasted the tin to remove impurities such as arsenic. In 1881 138 people were employed at the site to mine a seam of tin just below sea level but this and a subsequent period of operation from 1911-1913 were not very successful because tin production was sporadic taken 20/3/15

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Zennor
Rydal Wood footpath
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A picture tour of St Agnes - in the county of Cornwall
St Agnes

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5 stars
Photographer: © Pat Trout (Gallery)Premier Member! Click for more info..(27th March 2015)
Description

St Agnes

Wheal Coates is a former tin mine situated on the north coast of Cornwall, England, on the cliff tops between Porthtowan and St Agnes. It is preserved and maintained by the National Trust. ‘Wheal’ is Cornish for ‘place of work’, not 'mine' as is often stated. The term for 'mine' is 'bal', as in 'bal maidens', the women who worked on the surface. The site was worked for centuries but the surviving buildings date from the 1870s when deep underground mining began at the site and were stabilised and preserved in 1986. There are three engine houses that formerly housed Cornish engines. Towanroath Pumping Engine House (1872) was used to pump water from the adjacent 600 ft Towanroath shaft. Whim Engine House was added in 1880 to crush ore for processing. A calciner dating from 1910–1913 roasted the tin to remove impurities such as arsenic. In 1881 138 people were employed at the site to mine a seam of tin just below sea level but this and a subsequent period of operation from 1911-1913 were not very successful because tin production was sporadic taken 20/3/15
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Camera Make: Panasonic Model: DMC-FZ72
Exposure Program: Landscape, Focal length: 5.78 mm, ISO: 200, Exposure time: 1/1300 sec, Metering Mode: Multi-Segment, Exposure Bias: 0 EV
Date/Time Creation: March 20, 2015, 1:47 pm
Exposure Mode: 2,
ImageID:1195740, Image size: 1024 x 768 pixels

This image is available to purchase and is part of our St Agnes Stock Photos Collection.

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5 stars
Comment by rustyruth(6th April 2015)

This is a very nice shot Pat, you've captured a brooding atmosphere.

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5 stars
Comment by Brian Gudgeon(6th April 2015)

Touch of the Poldark about this shot, Pat. Lovely view.

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Comment by Dave John(6th April 2015)

Excellent shot Pat, nice and moody. Will probably put Vince in a mood too!!!

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Comment by Vince Hawthorn(6th April 2015)

Oh yes and like many a photographer - been there done that. I believe that this view or the shot of the Crowns at Botallack rank as one of the most photographed scenes in Kernow. And as Ruth says you have caught a mood in this pic. And I wonder which Poldark is Brian referring to, the new one or the Robin Ellis version ? I reckon a lot of the old fans prefer the original- Lyn certainly does.

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5 stars
Comment by Colin Jones(10th April 2015)

Excellent shot what an atmosphere

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