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Tips please

 
Vince Hawthorn
Vince Hawthorn
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quotePosted at 22:06 on 29th March 2014

  I would go sport mode John, it will fire off shots all the time you keep finger on the button and the exposures will be as fast as poss, if shooting RAW you will only have a finite number of pics before the buffer fills up and you will have to wait for the reader to catch up.

 Before you go practice panning at Manston while you can. 



Edited by: Vince Hawthorn at:29th March 2014 22:07
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Vince Hawthorn
Vince Hawthorn
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quotePosted at 22:11 on 29th March 2014
  Another thought is on some cameras if you shoot with video some will let you pick the best frame to print out- I imagine the image quality might not be as good single frames.
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Vince Hawthorn
Vince Hawthorn
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quotePosted at 22:12 on 29th March 2014
  You will not be able to sleep at night with all that quiet.
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Rod Burkey
Rod Burkey
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quotePosted at 02:47 on 30th March 2014

When shooting into the sky, the camera will, if left on auto underexpose an aircraft, as it will almost inevitably be darker than the background. Not aquainted with your camera John, but if you can overexpose by one stop and take a "gander" at the shot on the screen, and then if the 'plane  still looks too dark, increase the exposure again. Taking a few test shots is always worth the effort. RAW will allow a lot of post production, but getting it right in the camera will always give the best possible result. 

Looking forward to seeing your best result in the "latest pictures"  in July. Try taking a few before then of objects against the sky. 

Good luck. 

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Paul HiltonPremier Member - Click for more info
Paul Hilton
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quotePosted at 03:50 on 30th March 2014

As Rod says, be aware of the camera under exposing on sky shots of the planes, and to put any exposure compensation back to normal when taking pics at the static display. You'll be facing north which will help, not shooting into the sun. You didn't say which day/s you were going on?  Whichever, try to get there as earlybas poss--- you'll be quequeing for the car parks and then to get in.

 Centre of the runway will be crowded, so better off away from it, amd landing side will have planes lower. Websites such as airshow.co.uk will give you some idea of pics you might like to take from examples.

 Also, photos taken at RIAT are not allowed to be sold without their written permission as noted on their entry T&C's.  Have a great time when you get there. 

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rustyruth
rustyruth
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quotePosted at 20:26 on 30th March 2014
Look forward to seeing your pictures in July John, I've got to get myself in shape  for photographing the Tour de France coming passed my door in July too Smile

Edited by: rustyruth at:30th March 2014 20:27
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Vince Hawthorn
Vince Hawthorn
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quotePosted at 21:54 on 31st March 2014
On 30th March 2014 22:46, John Lawrence wrote:

Sorry to keep you all waiting looks very rude but not intentional i assure you.

I am going by coach (dont drive) staying Friday at hotel, all day at Fairford Sat then back home after brekky next day,

Vince I tried your idea today but managed to blur the lot! mind you I only had a runing river,

Rod I like your idea and have got time to try it, I don't think I willl shoot in RAW because that seems to slow down the camera. So i will look at exposures.

Paul , thanks for advice, I was considering taking a walk on the runway but will re-consider that decision!!

Ruth I look forward to your pics of the Tour De France some of the tips here may help you as well.

Once again my thanks to you all and apologies for not being around todayEmbarassed

   Try your panning practice with passing vehicles or trains , that way you could start to get sharper objects on the move with the blurred background to get the feel of speed at the same time.
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rustyruth
rustyruth
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quotePosted at 22:07 on 31st March 2014

That's probably good advice for me as well Vince to catch these speeding bikes. Got to admit I'll be glad when it's all over, the road closure notices are coming soon and it's not looking good Frown

Sorry for for hi jacking your thread John. 

 

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Dave John
Dave John
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quotePosted at 22:08 on 31st March 2014
If your camera has a 'spot metering' exposure setting it would be advisable to use that for flying aircraft. Spot metering concentrates on the central 4-5% of the frame. Worth trying it out on motorbikes or cyclists to get used to keeping that very small centre spot on the subject. You may find that you will still need to over expose slightly as indicated by Rod earlier. Always worth switching back to your normal metering method after a flying display but not absolutely vital

Edited by: Dave John at:31st March 2014 23:24
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Edward Lever
Edward Lever
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quotePosted at 22:13 on 31st March 2014

I can't add any other advice to what has been said already, but what is certain, photographing real-time dynamic events such as Air Tattoos, Regattas, Sports Events etc is a challenge to both the photographer's skills and the performance of the camera.

It wasn't until I tried taking pictures of rowing events that I realised a pro camera will shoot effortlessly at 10 frames per second whilst an amateur camera will perform like a snail on valium. Also, a fast lens is a great advantage, enabling you to shoot at shutter speeds faster than a thousandth of a second to freeze the action.

That's not to say you can't get great shots with a compact or with an amateur SLR and a tourist zoom, but it's definitely pot luck. The pros don't use the fast lenses and the rapid-fire cameras just to show off. They need the pro kit to get consistent results.

But to reiterate my original point, it's a challenge to try for that great shot with more modest kit, then dream of what you could do with pro kit. It is a great way of improving your skills and knowledge.

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