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Karen LeePremier Member - Click for more info
Karen Lee
Posts: 1556
Joined: 9th Mar 2011
Location: England
quotePosted at 18:49 on 24th September 2011

Can you tell me how to get a waterfall or fountain that has the milky look...please put it in simple terms...all help gratefully received,Thankyou 

 

 

 

 

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Andrew Marks
Andrew Marks
Posts: 59
Joined: 1st May 2011
Location: England
quotePosted at 19:07 on 24th September 2011

Karen, nice slow shutter speed should do it. And maybe some support like a tripod or monopod.

Andy

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Dave John
Dave John
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Joined: 27th Feb 2011
Location: England
quotePosted at 20:24 on 24th September 2011
As Andy says, slow shutter speed, ideally 1/8 or longer. The slower you go the more 'milky' the water will be. As with everything else experiment  ! ! ! As a very general rule of thumb the slowest speedyou should try to hand hold is as near to the focal lenght of the lens. 100mm lens  1/100 th sec    300mm 1/300th    25 mm 1/25th and so on. If you dont have a tripod or monopod find a wall or gate if possible and roll a jacket up to use as support. A lot of pros carry a 'bean bag' which is easy to make and more solid than a jacket as it moulds to the shape of the camera. I made my own many years ago and it still going strong. Basically a pocket of material filled with beads of any description, Mine is full of lentils or something similar if i remember. Don't cram it  full or it wont mould. About 1/2 - 3/4 full is ideal. Mine is about 10 x 8 inch and weighs just a few ounces. But whatever give it a whirl and lets see some so we can give more help if required. DJ
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Paul HiltonPremier Member - Click for more info
Paul Hilton
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Joined: 21st Nov 2004
Location: UK
quotePosted at 21:37 on 24th September 2011

As David mentioned, the first thing is the camera has to be absolutely still using a tripod, bean bag, or whatever. Also, don't take it on a windy day. Also, use the camera's self timer. Shutter speeds from around 1/2 sec to 2 seconds should get the effect you're after. But, if setting the ISO to it's lowest setting, and apeture to it's smallest, the shutter speed might still not go low enough on a sunny day, so a neutral density filter/ND would be useful to cut the light down more. I don't think your Ricoh CX2 will take filters ???  Non the less, if you put the camera at ISO 80; apeture priority, then stopping the lens down you should hopefully see the shutter speeds drop slow enough to get what you're after.

If you go to my Profile; click on my Flickr page and go to page 4, there's two photos taken at Abbey House Gardens; the larger waterfall was at 1 second, and the small stream one at 1/2 second. The in-built ND filter on the Canon G12  was used on both to get the shutter speeds down; ISO 80. G12 was on mini tripod.



Edited by: Paul Hilton at:24th September 2011 22:01
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Dave John
Dave John
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Joined: 27th Feb 2011
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quotePosted at 21:59 on 24th September 2011
Paul is absolutely spot on there Karen, The camera must be still and the easiest way to fire the shutter as Paul says is to use the built in self timer. But if you are gonna make this sort of thing a regular occurence you should look at buying a 'remote shutter release' There are several on the market with fittings for most camera, mine is made by Hahnel. They give your more control that the self timer (usually 2 or 10 seconds) Witha remote you hold the button in your hand and press it when you think the time is right. Mini tripods are available very reasonably, although with bigger tripods the adage 'you get what pay for' certainly applies.
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Vince Hawthorn
Vince Hawthorn
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Joined: 19th Apr 2010
Location: UK
quotePosted at 22:04 on 24th September 2011
  Hi Karen, Andy Dave and Paul have all answered the question for you to have a go at water capture. I must admit I had an experiment at this a few weeks ago at Cobham Mill, I have already posted 2 photos on POE taken standing on a bridge in the same spot. One photo is taken on auto and the other on speed priority ( I did break the rules though as it is a hand held shot) , you can see the difference-- the milky water shot was at 1/13th of a second. A point of interest- both pictures have been turned upside down as they just look better to me that way round.  PoE image numbers 1140248 and 1140249. Have fun experimenting!!
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Paul HiltonPremier Member - Click for more info
Paul Hilton
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Joined: 21st Nov 2004
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quotePosted at 23:31 on 24th September 2011

Suprised I haven't bumped into you at Cobham, Vince; been doing a lot of family history research there and indeed, your photo of St Andrews church has a long row of Sheryer graves in the foreground; that's the family I've been studying for many years. One of their inlaws  worked at Cobham Mill---William Farr, married Louisa Sheryer and died in the work house at Epsom. Over by the path towards Church Style house is a singular Sheryer grave, a daughter in law of the same family with her baby son.  Her grand daughter sadly passed away in Canada but a few months ago. Her daughter is buried a few miles down the A3 in Hampshire.   They were a very wealthy blacksmiths and property owning family in Cobham and surrounding in the 1800s, and their story begins in Downton, Wiltshire early 1700s. The road from the town to the mill used to be called Sheryer Hill. Their smithy was opposite the Bear pub.

Sorry to go off topic for a moment. 



Edited by: Paul Hilton at:24th September 2011 23:50
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Vince Hawthorn
Vince Hawthorn
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Joined: 19th Apr 2010
Location: UK
quotePosted at 23:56 on 24th September 2011
 No apology needed, interesting to have stories behind what we find in the places we photograph. Is this family history connected to yourself? it makes a change to see you doing research for yourself and not all and sundry here on POE who rely on your expertise.
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Paul HiltonPremier Member - Click for more info
Paul Hilton
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Joined: 21st Nov 2004
Location: UK
quotePosted at 00:48 on 25th September 2011
Actually Vince it was a lady in Canada who joined Poe in 2005 and asked me about her gt grandad---Charles Daniel Sheryer b. Cobham 1853; hubby of the lady in the sole grave at Cobham--as she thought he owned a farm near me in Kingsclere, prior to his 2nd marriage and going to Canada. Well, he had worked there for his relations, the Parretts of Wiltshire who owned the farm. The story that started to unfold is quite amazing. Daniel and Ann's son Thomas married Sally Freeland of Stoke D'Abernon and their son George was a wealthy farmer in the Wonersh/Cranleigh region, and with his uncle William Freeland, controlled many properties in Surrey( I have the deeds of some of them) His daughter Kate Sheryer married the grand son of Sir Henry Cole. Virtually all my photos of Surrey on Poe were taken researching this family over 6 years and still on-going, and my family tree of them, and their connections, are on Ancestry, over 400 people from late 1600s to mid-1900s, from wealthy people; extremey poor in the workhouse; one hanged for highway robbery, WW1 tank tester ( D M F Sheryer), a real mix that family in Canada had no idea about, and Cobham is where things start to happen in the latter 1700s; the stories behind some of those graves you by chance photographed---and the cemetery over by The Tilt. 

Edited by: Paul Hilton at:25th September 2011 08:12
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Paul HiltonPremier Member - Click for more info
Paul Hilton
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Joined: 21st Nov 2004
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quotePosted at 20:17 on 25th September 2011

Karen----he's an example  ISO 100, F22, 1/6th sec.

Ashness Bridge, Cumbria
Picture by Paul Hilton


 

 

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