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The Sir Nigel GresleyCornish coastline walking out to Rame Head ChapelNew Forest, HampshireFountainVillage Phonebox, MontacuteAt Watermead Country Park

Neutral Density Filters.

 
Rod Burkey
Rod Burkey
Posts: 522
Joined: 2nd Sep 2008
Location: UK
quotePosted at 09:33 on 13th May 2015

Anybody using these?

On impulse, I bought one last October whilst full of the euphoric joys of holiday madness. Sadly, I have yet to use this rather splendid bit of kit, but soon I do hope to capture “milky” waterfalls and dream like seas, plus much more. I really must!

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Dave John
Dave John
Posts: 22335
Joined: 27th Feb 2011
Location: England
quotePosted at 12:31 on 13th May 2015
ND filters are something I have though about but just not got round to getting one. As usual a lot will depend on what strength filter you get but almost certainly will require the use of a tripod as exposure times will be in seconds and certainly not hand holdable. If you are really adventurous and go for the currently favoured '10 stopper' exposure times will be into minutes, preceded by an outlay of quite a few coins of the realm to get a reasonbly good one . . . .  The top quality 10 stoppers are in excess of £100 or more I think
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Edward Lever
Edward Lever
Posts: 702
Joined: 22nd Dec 2005
Location: UK
quotePosted at 13:49 on 13th May 2015

Most of us in the UK struggle to get enough light rather than artificially reducing it, and it seems ironic if we have spent money on fast lenses.

Seriously though, I do understand the use of ND filters for getting those creamy waterfall effects, but it has never been something which excited me, since it means lugging a tripod around.

A sometimes forgotten effect of artificially prolonging the exposure time to many seconds is the increase in image noise. This will happen even if the ISO is set to a low value. 

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rustyruth
rustyruth
Posts: 18776
Joined: 23rd Oct 2012
Location: England
quotePosted at 15:52 on 13th May 2015
I've not got one - yet, I'm still trying to come to terms with all the other filters I seem to have acquired. Sadly the weather when we were away in Cornwall was so bad and I was ill, I never got to test out any of the graduated filters that I has bought.
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Rod Burkey
Rod Burkey
Posts: 522
Joined: 2nd Sep 2008
Location: UK
quotePosted at 16:21 on 13th May 2015
I must try the filter. It's a ten stopper. My photography is going through a less pretty phase at the moment, with a little more of a  documentary "edge" but little doubt, I will return to more of the kind of shots that I will submit POE, a site I still love. Another thread needed perhaps. 

Edited by: Rod Burkey at:13th May 2015 17:13
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Zbigniew Siwik
Zbigniew Siwik
Posts: 26
Joined: 30th Dec 2008
Location: Poland
quotePosted at 18:21 on 13th May 2015
I used both ND filtrer and fader , ( variable ND rarely , as is useless for wide angle shots ) . I think is worth to try , because with the ND filter , we can do the same image in a different way .
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Dave John
Dave John
Posts: 22335
Joined: 27th Feb 2011
Location: England
quotePosted at 20:53 on 13th May 2015

I would expect the filter manufacturer will have put some guide to exposures in the package but I have this one which may help .. If I have done it right ????

www.genkin.org/apps/ndfilters/ndfilters-10.htm

 Example exposure times

1/1000 sec equates to 1 sec

1/30 sec equates to 30 sec

1/4 sec equates to 4 minutes

1 second equates to 16 minutes!!!   During which time you could go away, make a cup of tea, drink it and do the washing up so you might need that tripod after all .... have fun and will be interested to hear how you get on with it!!



Edited by: Dave John at:13th May 2015 20:57
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Edward Lever
Edward Lever
Posts: 702
Joined: 22nd Dec 2005
Location: UK
quotePosted at 10:41 on 14th May 2015

On a general point, the good news for the user of extreme ND filters is that digital cameras are not affected by reciprocity failure, which film suffered from, so the figures in the table which Dave refers to are correct (but for digital only).

The bad news is that long exposures with a digital camera result in the sensor temperature rising (due to self-heating) and thermal noise can become a problem with exposure times of many minutes.

 



Edited by: Edward Lever at:14th May 2015 17:46
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Rod Burkey
Rod Burkey
Posts: 522
Joined: 2nd Sep 2008
Location: UK
quotePosted at 18:59 on 14th May 2015
So, Edward the old addage of "there's no such thing as a free lunch applies", it was ever thus.
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Edward Lever
Edward Lever
Posts: 702
Joined: 22nd Dec 2005
Location: UK
quotePosted at 07:58 on 15th May 2015
Exactly so, Rod, both film and digital have their limitations for long exposures. There doesn't seem to be much information about the increase in noise for long  exposures with a digital camera. The handbook for my Canon 7D simply says "since bulb exposures produce more noise than usual, the image might look a little grainy" - this could of course add to the 'artistic' effect.

Edited by: Edward Lever at:15th May 2015 07:58
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